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SP Prescott



“The function of a painting depicting space through cognitive linear and/or aerial perspective becomes an extraneous concept when confronted with a complex marriage of two and three dimensions, where space and its perception become a totally personal experience, as is our own perception of reality.”

SP Prescott takes 3-dimensionality to a different level, created in a way never before seen.

No trick lighting! No 3D glasses!

SP Prescott uses canvas as a sculptural medium, not constrained by the stretcher beneath, but rather using it as a support from which to build images which are both powerful and
sensitive: which reach out to the spectator, inviting or provoking response. Her work provides both a stimulating and controversial exhibition, certain to arouse much interest and speculation.

“As an artist, my inspiration comes from the juxtaposition of unrelated pieces of recycled canvas, finding links between colours, forms and techniques, combining them to form a new piece, resonating with renewed force, in a totally new and yet recycled form. I am not constrained to two dimensions, my images flowing out from the canvas, and through the stretcher to the void beneath, nothing is wasted, even space is used. This is a time of austerity and global awareness of the planet’s finite resources, and I honour that with my work, building new from old, with no idea of how to construct or realise the concept in my soul.”


Professor Maurice Cockrill, RA, FBA was a lifelong friend who was a regular and intrigued visitor to her studios both in London and St Ives. He was her tutor during her Pre-Diploma course in Liverpool, and she also studied under Brendan Neiland, RA for her BA Hons Fine Art in Manchester. Professor Cockrill once exclaimed: “I would run into a burning building to save that painting.”

Rachel Nicholson has been a great supporter of her work for many years, being fascinated by her carrying forward the essences of both her mother Barbara Hepworth, and her father Ben Nicholson, and projecting them in a modern and vibrant way.

Wilhelmina Barns-Graham was a close neighbour in St Ives until her sad demise a few years ago. She would often ask SP Prescott round for tea to discuss her work and SP would leave an hour or so later never having seen a tea cup! 


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