3 May 2015

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Art Interventions In The Natural World: An Outmoded Act Of Vanity?

After the recent arrest of Marco Evaristti in Iceland, when local landowners accused him of vandalism after the Danish-Chilean artist dyed the Strokkur geyser pink, Artlyst questions the morality of the artist appropriating nature as a canvas. Was this act a harmless intervention? or is it a signifier of our ever-growing dislocation from the natural […]

1 May 2015

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Art Forgery: Overinflated Prices And The Buffoonery Of Collectors

Given the range of names appearing in Artlyst’s forged artists countdown, you would be forgiven for thinking that the measure of an artist who has finally ‘made it’ is one who has been copied, and copied by stealth and deceit for monetary gain. For the driving influence behind why forgeries are made exists outside the […]

1 May 2015

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Curator Amanda Geitner Talks To Artlyst About Francis Bacon And A Very Personal Patronage

The Sainsbury Centre For Visual Arts presents ‘Francis Bacon and the Masters’, the latest exhibition bringing together over twenty-five major works by the great British painter Francis Bacon and juxtaposing them with old and modern masters, including Velázquez, Rembrandt, Titian, Michelangelo, Rodin, Van Gogh, Picasso, and Matisse. The exhibition forms the culmination of the celebrations […]

24 April 2015

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Francis Bacon: Sketching And The Skeleton In The Cupboard

I remember viewing the exhibition ‘Francis Bacon: Working on Paper’, at Tate Britain in February 1999 with some scepticism. Bacon claimed that he never did preparatory work, didn’t draw, or make sketches before beginning work on one of his visceral creations. I really believed that these alleged snippets into Bacon’s apparently illicit practice of sketching […]

24 April 2015

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Is The Mona Lisa Nothing More Than A Cultural Black Hole?

“Ars longa, vita brevis” should be uttered (and was, repeatedly, ad nauseum by my moustachioed diploma fine art tutor) with a heavy dose of irony. Yes, much art has a greater life span than the average puny human, yet even the Art Loss Register – a vast trove of seemingly endless recorded works gone, pinched, […]

22 April 2015

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Artnapping: Should Museums Pay The Ransom Or Lose The Art?

In 2013 Van Buuren Museum, Brussels, suffered a robbery in which several works of art were stolen from its collection; including ‘The Thinker’ (1907) by Dutch painter Kees van Dongen, estimated at a replacement value of €1.2 million, or over £861,000. Other works stolen in this audacious and swift art heist included a painting by […]

22 April 2015

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Thierry Morel Talks To Artlyst About Francis Bacon, Influence, And Memory

Francis Bacon and the Masters is the latest exhibition of works by the late-great British painter, bringing together over twenty-five major works by Bacon and juxtaposing them with old and modern masters, including Velázquez, Rembrandt, Titian, Michelangelo, Rodin, Van Gogh, Picasso and Matisse. Francis Bacon and the Masters forms the culmination of the celebrations marking […]

20 April 2015

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Interview With Artist Lucas Reiner by John Wisniewski Artlyst Exclusive

1) When did you begin drawing and painting, Lucas? My mother was an artist and so drawing and painting were always encouraged when I was young. It wasn’t until I was 20 years old that I began painting and drawing regularly. Martin Lubner was my first teacher and introduced me to a wide range of materials. We started with […]

19 April 2015

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Madonna Art Collector’s Humble Brag Is A Stand-Up Comedy Disaster

Last week Madonna got up on the Tonight Show, hosted by Jimmy Fallon, in a staged and contrived act and performed not the best of her 80s music, in medley form, (judging by her get-up) but a cringable stand-up comedy routine. She dug out some of her mothballed desperately seeking susan gear from the back of […]

17 April 2015

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Why Art Offends: A Perfect Storm In A Teacup

Artlyst recently created a list of the most offensive works of art; so what is the difference between this and its idea of hated art? Our good friend Marcel Duchamp may hold the answer. For the critical point in tipping the urinal over, marking it ‘R. Mutt’ and placing it in a gallery – launching […]

10 April 2015

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Tate’s Chris Dercon Rumoured Resignation NPG’s Sandy Nairne Bows Out

Artlyst is not normally one for conspiracy theories, but we have noticed an alarming trend with the seeming exodus of London’s leading museum directors. This includes the resignation of Neil MacGregor, the Director of the British Museum, Dr. Nicolas Penny retiring from the National Gallery, and Director Penelope Curtis resigning from Tate Britain – everyone […]

10 April 2015

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London’s Leading Museum Directors Exit In Droves

Do I detect a pattern here? There is an exodus afoot amongst the highest echelons of museum management; in the past twelve months the resignations have been announced of Nicholas Penny (National Gallery), Sandy Nairne (National Portrait Gallery), Penelope Curtis (Tate Britain), and now the biggest of the cheeses: Neil MacGregor of the British Museum. This is not a case of incompetency. Far […]

9 April 2015

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Debora Delmar Corp. Talks To Artlyst About Upward Mobility, Assemblage, And The Cult Of Celebrity

Modern Art Oxford presents ‘Upward Mobility’ a major new site-specific installation by Debora Delmar Corp. This is the adopted name of Mexican artist Débora Delmar, a name that was chosen after reflecting on capitalist lifestyles and aspirational aesthetics. Working with sculpture, video and installation, Debora Delmar Corp. explores the way in which our global consumer […]

2 April 2015

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Jeff Koons And The Ten Million Pound Easter Egg

Religious or not, we are all familiar with the spirit of giving, new life and general goodwill associated with decorating and eating eggs at Easter. The practice in any case dates back to ancient times, Christianity only taking it up with later examples found from Mesopotamia; even later it was further established as a religious […]

1 April 2015

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Rembrandt vs Damien Hirst The Art And The Ego

Rembrandt, unlike Vermeer who made extraordinary universes out of small rooms in the provincial town of Delft, needed to leave his native Leiden for Amsterdam in order to drape his sitters in exotic costumes and enjoy the worldly benefits that his remarkable talent afforded him. Slowly, from clean, crisp portraits and history paintings, atmosphere crept […]

28 March 2015

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Hans Haacke Proposes Tate For Gift Horse Beyond The Fourth Plinth

In the second and final part of our featured discussion between Hans Haacke and Jon Bird at the ICA, we conclude that Mr Haacke’s work crosses boundaries of Conceptual, Minimal, Pop and site specific Land Art. His latest work unveiled on the Fourth Plinth in London’s Trafalgar Square titled,  ‘Gift Horse’ is no exception to the artist’s reputation […]

28 March 2015

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English Painter Edward Coyle Talks To Artlyst About Material Space, Aborted Futures, And Serendipity

Berloni Gallery presents ‘BUILD!’, a solo exhibition by English painter Edward Coyle, following the artist’s twelve month on-site residency at the gallery. Coyle creates a framework for his practice from various source materials, including photography and video, 3D modelling software, and data corruption processes, to form the basis of an empirical study into the conjectured […]

26 March 2015

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Art Outrage Is Subjective To The Zeitgeist Of Social Perception

The term ‘offence’, in the context of ‘to take offence at’ (as opposed to, an illegal offence or act against the law) is defined as an “annoyance or resentment brought about by a perceived insult to or disregard for oneself”. Thus if we look at artworks which have caused outrage over the centuries, we find […]

25 March 2015

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New Copyright Law Threatening To Put Artists And Publishers Behind Bars Is An Act Of Censorship

In light of recent decisions in the courts regarding the appropriation and use of images in works of art, that saw the Belgian artist Luc Tuymans found guilty of copyright infringement – after losing a legal battle in his home country over the alleged plagiarism concerning a portrait the artist created in 2011 – and […]

19 March 2015

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Why Contemporary Art Should Have More Of A Sense Of Humour

There is a strong case to be made that what we recognise as “high” art and laughter are entirely mutually exclusive: take the famous ‘Laughing Cavalier’ by Frans Hals found in the Wallace Collection. The title was bestowed on this anonymous sitter by tittering Victorian punters, and it’s been known as a gimmick painting ever […]

16 March 2015

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Hans Haacke In Conversation About His Recent Fourth Plinth Commission

Hans Haacke is a leading figure in the contemporary art world. His work crosses boundaries of  Conceptual, Minimal, Pop and site specific Land Art. He is best known for his investigations into hidden economies and politics including that of the art world and the suppressed histories of people and places. Haacke’s has always had strong […]

16 March 2015

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Gustave Courbet Case: Facebook Revises Rules Over Banned Content

Facebook has unveiled a revised and extended version of its “community standards” – the rule book through which the company governs what is acceptable material uploaded to the site by its 1.4 billion users; expanding the categories that it deems as unacceptable content, further clarifying what regular users worldwide are NOT allowed to upload and […]

14 March 2015

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Artlyst Tours Kirstie MacLeod’s First UK Solo Exhibition At Rook & Raven

Rook & Raven is currently presenting ‘Punctured Perspectives’, the first UK solo show of British artist Kirstie MacLeod. The artist is known for her unique and contemporary approach to the fine art of embroidery, juxtaposing the skill with the sensibilities of contemporary fine art, to create an altogether unique practice. MacLeod experiments with the idea […]

12 March 2015

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Artists Behaving Badly Infant Terrible Or Simply Self-indulgent Twats

There is an extremely thin line between embodying the tortured soul artiste, the infant terrible, and simply behaving like a self-indulgent twat to the annoyance of everyone else. A key factor which determines this delicate balance lies in the integrity of the artwork produced, combined with the degree to which the artist in question is […]

11 March 2015

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Is Damien Hirst Recruiting Photo-realist Painters To Boost His Flagging Paintings?

Damien Hirst’s company Science UK LTD, has placed an advert for photo-realist painters. The ad, posted on the Jobs section of the Guardian, lists the following requirements for any applicant: “Experience of working with oil paint necessary, good colour matching skills, and attention to detail are essential for this position. Candidates must have a BA […]

10 March 2015

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Tom Butler Talks To Artlyst About Inhabitants, Séances, And Concealment

CHARLIE SMITH LONDON is currently exhibiting the work of artist Tom Butler, with his second one person show at the gallery. The artist’s practice revolves around the appropriation of Victorian cabinet cards, which Butler paints into with delicate gouache in extreme detail, creating strange creatures through the addition of abstract forms, and sculptural drawing with […]

7 March 2015

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Alex Katz On Black Backgrounds and His Relationship With Poetry

Artlyst met up with the American Artist Alex Katz, on the eve of the opening of his latest show ‘Black Paintings,’ at the Timothy Taylor Gallery, in London. A talk with the Director of the Whitechapel Gallery, Iwona  Blazwick and the artist took place with a Q&A session. Here is the interview. On Black Backgrounds: […]

6 March 2015

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Etchings: A Peculiar Mid-point Between The Grand Officialness Of Painting

Etchings occupy a peculiar mid-point between the grand ‘officialness’ of the painting medium, historically seen as noble – whether oil, watercolour, synthetic or piss painting (Warhol) – and the medium of drawing on paper, by nature more likely to preparatory and doodling, an immediate mind thought dashed down with nowhere near the same degree of […]

4 March 2015

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New UK Public Artworks Under Threat After The Demise Of The Paolozzi Arches

After the recent revelation that the iconic Eduardo Paolozzi mosaic arches at Tottenham Court Road station, were not destroyed by Transport for London, but in fact covertly spirited away to a storage facility in Norfolk – an act of seeming subterfuge, potentially allowing TFL the freedom to sell the work without the prying eyes of […]

3 March 2015

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Eduardo Paolozzi Mosaic Arches Were Not Destroyed By TFL, But Stored

After the recent seeming destruction of the iconic Eduardo Paolozzi mosaic arches at Tottenham Court Road station, by Transport for London – an act that Artlyst believed to be one of the greatest acts of cultural vandalism in recent memory – It would now appear that the iconic work was in fact removed to a […]

1 March 2015

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Alex Katz In Conversation: On Process, Monochrome and Nude Models

Artlyst had the pleasure of joining the American Artist Alex Katz, on the eve of the opening of his latest show ‘Black Paintings,’ at the Timothy Taylor Gallery, in London, last week. This also featured a talk with the Director of the Whitechapel Gallery, Iwona  Blazwick and a Q&A session which we will be publishing […]

27 February 2015

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Does Violence In Art Still Have The Power To Shock?

Violence in art is obsolete. Today, what artwork depicting violence still has the power to shock? What purpose does violence in art have when we every day see images of conflict, whether in warfare, domestic or even humorous settings (the schadenfreude of the man falling into an open man-hole)? In ancient Greece violence in art […]