28 August 2018

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The Decline And Fall Of The Turner Prize – Edward Lucie-Smith

There can be no doubt that the Turner Prize is pretty much of a sick puppy right now.

20 August 2018

Women Need More Recognition For Their Contribution To Visual Arts – Edward Lucie-Smith

Nobody, I think, could be keener than I am to see women obtain more recognition for their creative contribution to the visual arts.

9 August 2018

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Populist Matters: The Rise and Fall of London’s Museum Attendance – Edward Lucie-Smith

At a time when London’s big art museums are going all out to be populist, they also seem to be witnessing a fairly general fall in attendances.

24 May 2018

Blue Chip Bling Art Features In New Las Vegas Gambling Palace

High value bluechip contemporary art displayed at alternative venues is usually something that excites us here at Artlyst; however,

17 May 2018

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Royal Academy Renewed: Integrating Culture With Daily Life – Edward Lucie-Smith

The Royal Academy’s radical extension of its premises including some splendid new exhibition spaces and an imposing new lecture-theatre excites me, but also generates some doubts and mixed feelings.

30 April 2018

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The Art Of Smug Turner Prize 2018 – Edward Lucie-Smith

This year’s list of finalists for the Turner Prize has just been announced. While the names on the shortlist are virtuously unfamiliar, the general artistic direction is not.

15 April 2018

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Picasso To Souza: The Crucifixion Imagery Rarely Exhibited – Revd Jonathan Evens

Overshadowed by iconic images from Picasso 1932 and Bacon/Freud two of the Tate’s current exhibitions feature powerfully expressive crucifixion images.

2 April 2018

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Stuckism Is Alive And Well And Living In Prague – Edward Lucie-Smith

I’m just back from a visit to Prague. I went there specifically to see an exhibition of new British painting organised by an organisation called ArtLines

26 March 2018

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David Bowie Statue Not Fitting A Man Who Loved Fine Art

The latest in a long line of examples is a new statue honouring the late artist David Bowie, unveiled over the weekend in Aylesbury.

8 March 2018

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Tate’s Big Faux-Pas: Picasso Exhibition Opens On International Women’s Day

Today (8th March) is International Women’s Day, it’s also the public opening of the new Picasso exhibition at Tate Modern. For those of you familiar with Picasso and his self-mythologized monster; you may need to read that sentence again.

6 March 2018

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Pablo Picasso: Genius Or Just Another Misogynistic Pig – Edward Lucie-Smith

With Pablo Picasso 1932 – Tate Modern’s major exhibition for the first half of this year – ready to open (March 8th), the drumbeats are already beginning.

21 February 2018

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Edward Lucie-Smith Bids A Final Farewell To The Avant-Garde

The contemporary art world seems an increasingly strange place to be.

6 January 2018

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Frank Gehry: Fondation Louis Vuitton Paris – An Architect’s Impression – Alex Murray

I had never experienced a Frank Gehry up-close. Never stood slack-jawed, gawping at the gymnastic splendours that the photographs in the glossies promise.

Sean Scully Indisputably The Most Universal Living Contemporary Artist- Edward Lucie-Smith

One name immediately sprang to mind – that of the born Irish, once British, now American painter Sean Scully.

31 December 2017

Things I Hate About The British Art World Today – Edward Lucie-Smith

The British contemporary art world is apparently in a healthy state at the moment.

18 December 2017

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Elisabeth Murdoch Appointed To Arts Council England National Council – Should We Worry?

On 5th December, seven new appointments were quietly made to Arts Council England’s (ACE) National Council, its governing board. This included the controversial choice of Elisabeth Murdoch, daughter of media mogul Rupert Murdoch. 

21 September 2017

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Basquiat: Colour Blind Expressions Of A Society Unheard – The Barbican

Basquiat used what he knew was out there on the streets the injustices towards black people.

11 August 2017

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Matisse vs The Multi-Cultural Multi-Ethnic 21st Century Art World – Edward Lucie-Smith

I went to see the R.A.’s new Matisse show, but not at the press view, as I was abroad. I did go very shortly after it opened. Not unexpectedly, it was jammed with visitors, and I mean jammed. You had to dodge round backs to get a proper view of some of the smaller items, notably the drawings.

2 July 2017

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Virtual Masterpiece The Masterpiece Art Fair By Edward Lucie-Smith

What people choose to describe as ‘a masterpiece’ is usually pretty much a matter of context. On the whole, at this annual beanfeast for conspicuous consumers, you won’t find much in the way of graffiti art lurking around, though it’s just possible that you might be confronted with a work by Jean-Michel Basquiat now that he’s included in the pantheon of artists with multi-million dollar price tags.

15 June 2017

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Qatar Boycott: Will It Marginalise The Region’s Cultural Renaissance?

Last October I was in Doha the capital of Qatar which seemed like a well-oiled machine when it came to Art, Education, and Culture.

17 April 2017

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Tate Britain Comes Out – Queer British Art 1861–1967 By Simon Tarrant

Imagine in 1988 the public furore if the Tate had hosted an exhibition of queer British art – marking the 21st anniversary of the 1967 Sexual Offences Act, which decriminalised private homosexual acts between men over 21 in England and Wales.

16 April 2017

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Michelangelo Plaster Casts More Convincing Than Sebastiano – National Gallery – Edward Lucie-Smith

The current Michelangelo & Sebastiano show at the National Gallery here in London is very much the kind of exhibition that one feels a great institution ought to be doing: spaciously presented, tirelessly scholarly, you couldn’t wish for a better introduction to these major names in Italian Renaissance art.

24 March 2017

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Fourth Plinth Commission “Good For A Disposable Laugh” – Edward Lucie-Smith

The next two occupants of the so-called Fourth Plinth Commission in Trafalgar Square have just been announced and, true to form, the British visual arts establishment has laboured and given birth to a mouse. Or, to be fair, to two mice, one of them just slightly larger than the other. I speak not in terms of size, but in those of probable effect.

4 February 2017

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George Boorujy An Artist Highlighting And Protecting Our Precious Natural World

Artist George Boorujy feels particularly pumped to take on the environmental cause, especially since ‘Day One’ the Environmental Protection Agency has been quieted with regard to global warming. Boorujy, an artist devoted to highlighting and protecting our precious natural world says, “This shouldn’t be a partisan issue! Democrats, as well as Republicans, need to breathe.

1 February 2017

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Knoedler Fraud Sentencing Sends Out Mixed Messages To Our Unregulated Industry

The Knoedler & Co. gallery fraud case which involved selling $80m/£63m in fake Abstract Expressionist artworks to unknowing collectors seems to be edging to a lenient closure for the corrupt dealer Glafira Rosales.

15 January 2017

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The Christian Science Connection Within The British Modern Art Movement

Christian Science does not explain the work of Nash and Nicolson just as surely as their work does not illustrate Mary Baker Eddy’s Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures.

13 January 2017

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Maria Balshaw: What’s A Great Contemporary Art Museum Without A Living Shaman

When Maria Balshaw takes over from Sir Nicolas Serota at Tate (not yet officially confirmed as I write this, but a racing certainty), she takes over an empire that seems to be in excellent health.

23 December 2016

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The Art World NOW – Deconstructing The Avant-Garde By Edward Lucie-Smith

During the last few years, the world of contemporary art has undergone a number of drastic changes, which many leading participants seem extremely reluctant to acknowledge.

19 December 2016

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Art Impacted – A Radical Response To Radicalisation By Revd Jonathan Evens

We face the world in which it appears ever more likely that a Clash of Civilisations will be played out on the world stage, potentially with weapons of mass destruction, as the axis of the world appears to have shifted significantly in this year of political shocks.

21 November 2016

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The Art Of The Firing Squad: Execution Expressed In Painting

In art, the firing squad is composed as much in time as it is in space; in these first words of Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s One Hundred Years of Solitude, we encounter a plethora of narrative potential for past future heroism.

6 November 2016

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Was Caravaggio A Good Christian? By Revd Jonathan Evens St Stephen Walbrook

Caravaggio – “What a man! What a painter, but what a man and what a believer.” Those are the words of François Bousquet, Rector of San Luigi dei Francesi in Rome, the church which, in the stunning Contarelli Chapel, houses the magnificent paintings which formed Caravaggio’s first major commission and made his reputation. Bousquet makes his assertion in the introductory film […]

27 November 2015

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OPINION: Shepard Fairey’s Eiffel Tower Installation Reflects The Freedom Of Paris

The famed street artist Shepard Fairey has recently revealed his contribution to the climate and sustainability debate in Paris, ahead of the Conference of Parties (COP21) in the french capital. The artist’s massive sphere – a truly global Christmas bauble for the city – dangled between the first and second floors of the Eiffel Tower. […]