19 January 2017

Paul Carey Kent’s Unofficial London Art Fair Awards 2017 Revealed

The verdict: “It seemed a little more even – and so a little duller – than usual this year”: less dire stuff, less outstanding material.

10 December 2016

Is Figurative Painting An Essential Form Of Art Making? By Edward Lucie-Smith

Painter’s Painters at the Saatchi Gallery picks up the theme of figurative painting as a still essential and central form of art making and tries to give it a new spin.

6 December 2016

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Art Basel Explored – Artlyst Survives Day Two of Miami Art Week

Art Basel Miami is the world’s largest and perhaps the most important art event in the world. It opened yesterday and takes place at the Miami Beach Convention Centre, all this week

15 November 2016

Bourgeois Bliss in Somerset Edward Lucie-Smith Gets His Wellies On

I’ve just made a visit – a first but not the last, I hope – to the much talked about Hauser & Wirth set up near Bruton in Somerset. I already knew their rather grand gallery situated on Savile Row in London, where it jostles elbows, so to speak, with our city’s grandest purveyors of […]

30 October 2016

FIAC 2016 a cheerful moment in Paris

I love Paris … and even more during FIAC. This year, in particular, the city of lights became the vibrant hub of the Art World with its incredible Museums and Galleries, its exhibitions and top-notch Art Fairs.

28 October 2016

Paul Nash – A Modernist Paradox by Edward Lucie-Smith

The elegant new Paul Nash retrospective just opened at Tate Britain offers a welcome contrast to some of the dismal offerings that have been unveiled there in the recent past. It celebrates an important British artist and does so in a thoroughgoing way.

24 October 2016

Dia Al Azzawi Conflict And Humanitarian Crisis Starkly Depicted In Paint

Dia Al Azzawi is in every way shape or form a painter’s painter. His application and layering of colour can be rich and sublime like Matisse or Leger but also his use of monochromatic elements resembling newspaper clippings are a most powerful vehicle for getting his imagery to act as a mouthpiece for his politically charged subject matter.

22 October 2016

Rodin’s Relationship To Dance Explored In New Unashamedly Academic Courtauld Exhibition

The Courtauld Gallery’s small, intimate, two room exhibition is devoted to a little-known body of work made by Rodin in the last two decades of his life. Rodin & Dance: The Essence of Movement 20 October 2016 – 22 January 2017 / The Courtauld Gallery

18 October 2016

Marilyn Marilyn Monroe Exhibition Curated By Whoopi Goldberg Unveiled In NY

Review of Mana Contemporary NY presents: Marilyn: Character Not Image September 25, 2016 – October 22, 2016 Curated by Whoopi Goldberg

16 October 2016

Looking Back at Frieze London 2016 by Edward Lucie-Smith

Never previously have the Frieze Art Fairs here in London seemed larger, grander, or surer of their place in the universe of contemporary culture.

15 October 2016

Picasso Portraits – master of transformations at National Portrait Gallery by Edward Lucie-Smith

 London is unusually rich in important exhibitions at the moment, and sometimes these events seem to enter into a dialogue with each other. This is especially the case with the Picasso portrait show now at the National Portrait Gallery and the big Abstract Expressionist exhibition on offer at the Royal Academy. Abstract Expressionism was, among […]

13 October 2016

Above And Beyond Caravaggio: Just How Far Beyond By Edward Lucie -Smith

The new Beyond Caravaggio show in the sepulchral depths of the new wing of the National Gallery deserves to draw a large and enthusiastic public and will in all probability do so.

27 September 2016

UP YOURS! The Turner Prize Is Relevant Again Almost – By Edward Lucie-Smith

Since its heyday in the 1990s, when it helped to establish the reputation of the last really significant art movement in Britain – or perhaps anywhere else – that of the so-called YBAs or Younger British Artists – the Turner Prize has been in decline.

14 September 2016

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Inside Reading Gaol Amanda McGregor Asks Who else is imprisoned unfairly?

As the hand that creates, then wipes the tears from the strong, we question the nature of suffering. The architecture of space that is in the human consciousness, which allows for isolation and emotional neglect needs a more defined understanding of it’s infrastructure. We are historically at a point of considered presence in which the need […]

29 July 2016

Mark Wallinger: Recumbent Analysand Reflected In Mirrors Freud Museum London

A new installation by the Turner Prize winning artist Mark Wallinger, curated by Natasha Hoare, opened last night at the Freud Museum in London. It explores self reflection and consists of three key works. The most spectacular is the installation of a mirrored ceiling in the room used by the father of Psychoanalysis, Sigmund Freud, as his office. ‘Study […]

19 July 2016

Must-See this Summer: Les Rencontres Photographiques d’Arles, France until 25 September

Leaving grey and depressed post-Brexit London to attend Les Rencontres photographiques d’Arles in south of France was a relief. The journey from London is fast and yet landing at Nimes airport looks like putting a foot on a different planet. The sun is shining strongly, burning even, and the deep blue of the sky reminds you why Van Gogh, countless artists and photographers […]

18 July 2016

Camberwell MA Arts Degree Shows 2016

This year’s Camberwell College of Arts Postgraduate Summer Show is taking place in Camberwell’s Wilson Road space. I actually think this space is a lot more open and easier to navigate than the main college. MA Book Arts I started by looking at MA Book Arts. Although labelled ‘book arts’, this section contained a huge […]

16 July 2016

Carlo Carra Both A Revolutionary And A Conservative – Blain/Southern London

A number of the major commercial galleries in London now offer shows which are, in terms of interest and quality, very much on a level with what one finds in London’s major public galleries. The new exhibition at Blain/Southern in Hanover Square offers a good example of this. Entitled Carlo Carrà, Metaphysical Spaces, it considers the career of one of the […]

13 July 2016

What’s Up In Russia? Stop By London’s Pushkin House Cultural Centre

Few things are more confusing to the aficionado of contemporary art than the simple question ‘What’s going on in Russia?’ A current show, entitled Drawing: No Limits, at Pushkin House, the Russian cultural centre in London, makes a valiant if not entirely successful to answer this question. Not entirely successful because it gives a chaotic impression of what can now be […]

13 July 2016

Liverpool Biennial Is The Place To Be For Art This Summer

The ninth edition of the Liverpool Biennial got off to an impressive start last weekend with a varied array of events and exhibitions to see. Every two years international artists are invited to participate in what has now become one of the world’s most respected art biennials. The year’s theme examines the city’s past, present and future. Some […]

11 July 2016

David Hockney Yosemite Series: Digital Mischief In An Analogue World

Sly and obliquely, but also unmistakably, another Hockney show currently available in London, this time at Annely Juda Fine Art, the artist’s regular dealer, casts doubt on the proposition the Royal Academy exhibition of his recent portraits seems determined to put forward, which is that nothing can match a figurative painting made when directly confronting the subject, with no technology to modify […]

9 July 2016

Greg Smith Explores Cross Section Between Art And Computer Science

New York – Greg Smith is not your run of the mill artist. Holding both a MFA from Hunter College and a PhD in Physics from Harvard, Smith’s work plays off of contemporary trends in a clever way, highlighting technology’s effect on all aspects of artistic production. His current exhibition at Susan Inglett Gallery, Zero Width Non-Joiner, explores the cross […]

6 July 2016

Georgia O’Keeffe On My Mind Edward Lucie-Smith Surveys The Retrospective

Georgia O’Keeffe, now the subject of a large solo show just opened at Tate Modern, is a slightly odd case in the story of American art. She became famous very early, thanks to the efforts of her patron, lover and eventual husband Alfred Stieglitz, who, in addition to being a leading Modern Movement photographer, was […]

30 June 2016

David Hockney Portraits: A Panoramic Glimpse Into The Life Of A National Treasure

David Hockney has, after a much reported domestic catastrophe in Bridlington – the untimely death of a young member of his entourage – returned to the peace and quiet of California. He nevertheless remains a British National Treasure. No other British artist enjoys so much affection, combined with real solid celebrity, among his compatriots. The huge turn out for the Private View […]

14 June 2016

Louise Nevelson: Recreating A Slightly Mournful Age In Black

The big campaign to give more recognition to women artist is gathering pace at Tate Modern, with a solo show by Mona Hatoum on view and one by Georgia O’Keeffe opening soon. It’s high time – t would be churlish to deny that. Now Pace London has joined in, with a big show devoted ton the work of Louise Nevelson […]

10 June 2016

Alex Katz Drive-by Art: An Exploitation of Flatness By Edward Lucie-Smith

Alex Katz (b. 1927) is a senior figure, in all senses of that term, in the American art world, but perhaps not quite such a big deal here in London as some of this compatriots and contemporaries. If you are Jasper Johns (b. 1930) you get the Courtauld Gallery, side by side with major Impressionists and Old Masters. If you are Chuck […]

9 June 2016

Bhupen Khakhar Naive Painter Or Brutally Effective Ironist

Appropriately entitled ‘You Can’t Please All’, the show at Tate Modern for this celebrated Indian artist is first international respective of his work to be held anywhere since his death in 2003. The handlist to the exhibition rashly asserts that Khakhar ‘played a central role in modern Indian art.’ This claim is difficult to sustain because one of the […]

8 June 2016

Richard Wilson’s Duo Vision Helps Evolve Royal Academy Summer Show 2016

This year’s Royal Academy Summer Exhibition is the 248th edition and opens to the public next week on 13 June.  One of the founding principles of the Royal Academy was to mount an annual exhibition open to all artists in order to finance the training of young artists in the Royal Academy Schools.  Accordingly, the Summer […]

25 May 2016

Yayoi Kusama: Mesmerising Attractions Despite Queues Like Disneyland

It’s six o’clock on a warm spring night, I head to down to the Victoria Miro Gallery in Islington to the private view of the much-anticipated Yayoi Kusama exhibition. I’m early but there’s a long queue that stretches all the way down Wharf Road and I trudge to the back. After 45 minutes of waiting and […]

20 May 2016

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Photo London 2016 Assertively Swaggers After Last Year’s Experiment

This year’s Photo London moves with swagger after last year’s experiment, asserting itself as an international event of note, clear and focussed rather than brash, assured rather than overproduced. The majority of the works on display are, on the whole, still saleable, but most galleries are playing less safe than they did last year, showcasing […]

18 May 2016

Mona Hatoum: Hair, Electricity And Barbed Wire Tate Modern

Mona Hatoum’s work, as collected together in this retrospective, neatly straddles recent preoccupations at the great institution where it currently resides. There’s quite a lot to do with performance art, though the artist seems to have moved away from this in recent years. There are political echoes from the ever-turbulent Middle East. Hatoum was born in Beirut to a Palestinian family in […]

9 May 2016

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Frieze NY Round-Up Lizanne Merrill Spots Sparkle At A Lacklustre Fair

The New York iteration of London’s seminal Frieze art fair event, held on the idyllic landscape of Randalls Island was plagued with grey skies this year, in more ways than just the weather. Frieze’s 5th  season in New York, was lacking  in spark.  Very little was new. Very little challenged the status quo or inspired further thought. […]